The Keys to Communicating Change

“I just don’t get it,” he sighed. “I feel like I’ve been repeating the same thing for months until I’m blue in the face. Why aren’t people getting on board with the new vision?”

Many of the leaders I work with are in the midst of leading through change. Some big, some small, but all with their own unique challenges. 
I’ve found there are three common denominators why people tend to resist change and what we can do about it. 

I wrote a post for Catalyst that talks more about this that published today & I’d love to hear your thoughts.  

Do Women Have Something of Value to Say?

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I’ll have to admit I was a bit shocked with the social circus that erupted yesterday surrounding The Nines. Comments were taken out of context, included in a snapshot & spread like wildfire from there.

I know Todd Rhoades, others in senior leadership with The Leadership Network and have spoken at The Nines myself. To say they are biased in any capacity or don’t value the opinions of women is just ridiculous. Christianity Today added more context to what was going on for those interested in the whole story.

Quite frankly, I want to just shake my head in disappointment whenever someone asks me about “gender equality” or why more women aren’t represented on the stage of leadership issues in the church. I recognize there are some very real challenges with how some interpret who can and cannot teach others in a biblical setting that are several pay grades above my ability to weigh in.

But this isn’t about that.

My hope is that when I’m asked to speak at an event, it’s because the organizers believe it’s because I have something of value to offer participants and it fits their programming goals. Not because they need X number of females or Y% of ethnic representation and I fit the bill. Anything less would just be a slap in the face.

If we need to bring awareness to those who are doing great things but may be under the radar, then let’s do that… regardless of what flavor or gender they may be. But let’s not pretend it should be expected just because we’re female. Or black. Or white. Or (fill in the blank).

A platform is earned because of what we have to offer.

Echo ’13 :: Telling Your Story [notes & goodies]

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Thanks again for everyone who came yesterday. As promised, here are the key slides, video links & notes from people who did a fantastic job of making me sound smarter than I actually am. 

Video Links

Live Notes

  • Josh Burns [@jburno] 
  • Adam Legg [@AdamLegg]
  • And an insanely cool artistic notes version by Candace Payne [above]Image

Charts & Slides

Leading Well

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If you are a leader, I want you to know about a recently released book that will help you in your leadership journey. Many of you are familiar with Catalyst, the innovative and experiential leadership movement that has been going on for now almost 14 years, and now one of America’s most influential leadership organizations, with conferences and leadership gatherings all around the US. 

Well, recently Catalyst released a game changing book entitled The Catalyst Leader. My good friend, Brad Lomenick authors this leadership book, based on his 20 years of leadership experience, as well as the last 10 years experience as the president and lead visionary of Catalyst. In it Brad identifies and captures what he calls the 8 Essentials for Becoming a Change Maker. Ultimately identifying the essentials of a Catalyst Leader needed for leading well, and leading now. 

You can purchase the book wherever books are sold or head to http://catalystleader.com to learn more. I can’t recommend this book enough, whether you are a young leader or seasoned sage. It’s filled with practical leadership advice and application. 

The best leaders are the ones that are always learning. This is a resource worth checking out. 

Burned

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I’m amazed at the number of senior pastors that are stepping down—not only from leading their churches, but ministry in general—because they’re worn down physically, emotionally & spiritually by the labor of ministry.

Time after time I hear senior leaders tell me they are simply exhausted. And if you peek behind the curtain, more often than not it’s the ‘churched’ people in the congregation doing the damage through constant political battles, derailing vision and bickering over petty issues. If more people had the greater good in mind instead of focusing on their own agendas, one can only wonder what might happen to advance the Kingdom.

We have boards, elders and deacons to keep senior leaders accountable, but who is holding the congregation in check and to the same standards? Who is refueling the pastor?

It’s not only disheartening but alarming. Leaders once on fire with a vision to make a difference are leaving ministry. Not because of moral failures or scandal but because the daily grind of people and politics eventually took everything they had and left them with nothing more to offer.

Thoughts?