Collyde Summit ’14 :: Highlights

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I have to say, as a first-time attendee/speaker at Collyde Summit, I was so impressed.

There was such a great group of speakers with huge hearts to help those that are helping others & the team who made it all happen were nothing short of spectacular. I can’t wait to see what they have planned for next year.

And I’d like to thank everyone who attended (especially those willing to sit on the floor) as well as the amazing Rich Birch for keeping the crazy at bay while we worked through tech set-up. You guys were all fantastic and I loved hearing your stories. An extra big thanks goes to Kristen Hamilton for suggesting me to Jinu, and to Jinu for inviting me to participate. I’m honored & grateful.

As promised, here’s a link to the highlights & slides you guys wanted to keep.

If there’s anything else I can do to help, feel free to drop me an email: dnicole (at) AspireOne (dot) com otherwise I’d love to hear in the comments what you valued most about Collyde this year.

Do Women Have Something of Value to Say?

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I’ll have to admit I was a bit shocked with the social circus that erupted yesterday surrounding The Nines. Comments were taken out of context, included in a snapshot & spread like wildfire from there.

I know Todd Rhoades, others in senior leadership with The Leadership Network and have spoken at The Nines myself. To say they are biased in any capacity or don’t value the opinions of women is just ridiculous. Christianity Today added more context to what was going on for those interested in the whole story.

Quite frankly, I want to just shake my head in disappointment whenever someone asks me about “gender equality” or why more women aren’t represented on the stage of leadership issues in the church. I recognize there are some very real challenges with how some interpret who can and cannot teach others in a biblical setting that are several pay grades above my ability to weigh in.

But this isn’t about that.

My hope is that when I’m asked to speak at an event, it’s because the organizers believe it’s because I have something of value to offer participants and it fits their programming goals. Not because they need X number of females or Y% of ethnic representation and I fit the bill. Anything less would just be a slap in the face.

If we need to bring awareness to those who are doing great things but may be under the radar, then let’s do that… regardless of what flavor or gender they may be. But let’s not pretend it should be expected just because we’re female. Or black. Or white. Or (fill in the blank).

A platform is earned because of what we have to offer.

Echo ’13 :: Telling Your Story [notes & goodies]

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Thanks again for everyone who came yesterday. As promised, here are the key slides, video links & notes from people who did a fantastic job of making me sound smarter than I actually am. 

Video Links

Live Notes

  • Josh Burns [@jburno] 
  • Adam Legg [@AdamLegg]
  • And an insanely cool artistic notes version by Candace Payne [above]Image

Charts & Slides

Leading Well

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If you are a leader, I want you to know about a recently released book that will help you in your leadership journey. Many of you are familiar with Catalyst, the innovative and experiential leadership movement that has been going on for now almost 14 years, and now one of America’s most influential leadership organizations, with conferences and leadership gatherings all around the US. 

Well, recently Catalyst released a game changing book entitled The Catalyst Leader. My good friend, Brad Lomenick authors this leadership book, based on his 20 years of leadership experience, as well as the last 10 years experience as the president and lead visionary of Catalyst. In it Brad identifies and captures what he calls the 8 Essentials for Becoming a Change Maker. Ultimately identifying the essentials of a Catalyst Leader needed for leading well, and leading now. 

You can purchase the book wherever books are sold or head to http://catalystleader.com to learn more. I can’t recommend this book enough, whether you are a young leader or seasoned sage. It’s filled with practical leadership advice and application. 

The best leaders are the ones that are always learning. This is a resource worth checking out. 

Burned

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I’m amazed at the number of senior pastors that are stepping down—not only from leading their churches, but ministry in general—because they’re worn down physically, emotionally & spiritually by the labor of ministry.

Time after time I hear senior leaders tell me they are simply exhausted. And if you peek behind the curtain, more often than not it’s the ‘churched’ people in the congregation doing the damage through constant political battles, derailing vision and bickering over petty issues. If more people had the greater good in mind instead of focusing on their own agendas, one can only wonder what might happen to advance the Kingdom.

We have boards, elders and deacons to keep senior leaders accountable, but who is holding the congregation in check and to the same standards? Who is refueling the pastor?

It’s not only disheartening but alarming. Leaders once on fire with a vision to make a difference are leaving ministry. Not because of moral failures or scandal but because the daily grind of people and politics eventually took everything they had and left them with nothing more to offer.

Thoughts?

Why Do I Work With Churches?

A lot of people ask me this. Especially my marketplace friends making a billion dollars more than me.

“Isn’t working with nonprofits.. well, not… profitable?” they tend to wonder aloud.

(It’s not. But that’s not the point.)

It’s because I’m desperately hoping more churches will do this:

You can read the full story, along with everyone else who’s welcome at Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Community here. (Hat tip to Jon Acuff for the post)

Best part is this doesn’t require a talented graphic designer. Or custom series graphics. Or a big print budget.

But I bet it’s insanely effective.

What Does Mickey Mouse Have to do with Ministry?

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I recently had the privilege of participating in a series Church Marketing Sucks created, “Church Communication Heros.” Each author was asked to write a post about who inspires us and could be viewed as a “hero” in church communications.

One of my favorites is Walt Disney. I’ve been a huge fan since I was a little girl. His vision, imagination, standard for excellence and attention to detail are traits we can all aspire to.

The rest of the post can be read here. Who inspires you?

New Therapy Group

Last night was been difficult. And the truth is, I’m still struggling.

Not just with the fact my phone has been stolen but realizing the degree to which I became completely unhinged upon learning it was taken. My hands were shaking, I couldn’t focus or think. I called my husband sobbing, asking him to help me use the “Find My iPhone” utility I had installed somewhere but had no idea how to actually use. (The irony of that last part is just hilarious)

I had literally fallen in love with that thing.

As I crawled into bed, exhausted and still an emotional wreck, I needed to give myself a hard slap in the form of a reality check.

My husband still loves me and is safe.

My kids are healthy and still safe.

The world has, in fact, not come to an end.

I’m embarrassed to admit how horrifically out of balance my priorities had become. Yes, it is a cool phone but it’s still just a phone. And as much as I hated my Blackberry, it’s still capable of performing basic functions it’ll do until we can afford another iPhone.

I’d love to start a support group for those of us who’ve either lost or had our phones taken. Perhaps some sort of 12-step recovery program to help get our lives back on track. (And former Blackberry users would get extra therapy since we’ve been exposed to the knowledge phones can actually do more than dial and receive email)

Feel free to share coping strategies…

RFP Questions to Ask

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1) How would you help us solve this problem?

2) Who else have you helped?

3) What will it take to get us there? (time, budget, resources)

That’s it.

Don’t get me wrong. I understand where a Request for Proposal comes from and the purpose it can serve. But oftentimes an organization believes it needs to know HOW to solve the problem when creating the RFP and subsequently compares costs against executing that solution.

But it doesn’t matter which car we drive if we’re headed in the wrong direction. Don’t feel the pressure to figure out the how—That’s a big part of what you’re paying for.

Instead, tell them what needs to be fixed and look for a team that truly seeks to understand your needs, your culture and has the experience to back them up. Chances are high the proposed solution may not be what you expect but you’ll be delighted with the results.